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I've just finished my first watch of Voyager, and in the past year also watched DS9 for the first time, and I feel like we've regressed so much when it comes to tv characters. Voyager has strong women, who are sensitive; strong men, who are sensitive; men who believe in logic; women who believe in logic; men who are a bit goofy, but have important skills and get respect; women who are angry, but have important skills and get respect.

And for none of these characters the fact that "I'm a man but sensitive" or "I'm a woman but a really good leader" is a big deal. It's just who they are, but it's not their character arch.

I love it and feel like we've lost this completely on tv. If you're not stereotypically man / woman, that's the story for your character. So boring!

So, yeah, I just started an immediate re-watch because the Spaceship is my safe place.

I've just finished my first watch of Voyager, and in the past year also watched DS9 for the first time, and I feel like we've regressed so much when it comes to tv characters. Voyager has strong women, who are sensitive; strong men, who are sensitive; men who believe in logic; women who believe in logic; men who are a bit goofy, but have important skills and get respect; women who are angry, but have important skills and get respect. And for none of these characters the fact that "I'm a man but sensitive" or "I'm a woman but a really good leader" is a big deal. It's just who they are, but it's not their character arch. I love it and feel like we've lost this completely on tv. If you're not stereotypically man / woman, that's the story for your character. So boring! So, yeah, I just started an immediate re-watch because the Spaceship is my safe place.

21 comments

[–] ActualWendy 1 points (+1|-0)

This essay by Sheridan Sinclair called "That time Star Trek TNG did an episode on gender identity ..."

In 1992 they’d tried to do an episode of Star Trek that was an allegory of homosexuality and gay conversion therapy. The problem was the slap-dashed arse up way they did it, especially by chickening out and casting women as the Jna’ii instead of men, it comes across as a great bit stonking story about gender identity.

The essay points out that young people today read this episode as a defense of affirmation of gender identity, when it really was a messed up attempt at a gay allegory, but Star Trek couldn't have Riker getting busy with a male actor playing a genderless alien.